King Lear, by William Shakespeare1

СодержаниеContent
Introduction 3
King Lear, by William Shakespeare 4
Conclusion 4
Sources 4

ВведениеIntroduction

King Lear, by William Shakespeare, is a tragic tale of filial conflict, personal transformation, and loss. The story revolves around the King who foolishly alienates his only truly devoted daughter and realizes too late the true nature of his other two daughters. A major subplot involves the illegitimate son of Gloucester, Edmund, who plans to discredit his brother Edgar and betray his father. With these and other major characters in the play, Shakespeare clearly asserts that human nature is either entirely good, or entirely evil. Some characters experience a transformative phase, where by some trial or ordeal their nature is profoundly changed. Shakespeare stands on human nature in King Lear by looking at specific characters in the play: Cordelia who is wholly good, Edmund who is wholly evil, and Lear whose nature is transformed by the realization of his folly and his descent into madness.
The aim of our research is to prove that the problems raised in the play are still vital to the readers now at the beginning of the 21st century.




Список литературыSources
1. Kermode, Frank. "King Lear." The Riverside Shakespeare. Ed. G. Blakemore Evans and J.J.M. Tobin. Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 1997. pp. 1297-1302.
2. Shakespeare, William. "King Lear." Folger Shakespeare Library edition. Simon and Schuster, July 2005. pp. 347-361
3. Shakespeare, William. The Tragedy of King Lear. The Riverside Shakespeare. Ed. G. Blakemore Evans and J.J.M. Tobin. Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 1997. pp. 1303-1343.